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A mixed method evaluation of a theory based intervention to reduce sedentary behaviour in contact centres- the stand up for health stepped wedge feasibility study.

Bibliographic Details
Title: A mixed method evaluation of a theory based intervention to reduce sedentary behaviour in contact centres- the stand up for health stepped wedge feasibility study.
Authors: Sivaramakrishnan, Divya, Baker, Graham, Parker, Richard A., Manner, Jillian, Lloyd, Scott, Jepson, Ruth
Source: PLoS ONE; 12/15/2023, Vol. 18 Issue 12, p1-32, 32p
Abstract: Introduction: Contact centres have higher levels of sedentary behaviour than other office-based workplaces. Stand Up for Health (SUH) is a theory-based intervention developed using the 6SQuID framework to reduce sedentary behaviour in contact centre workers. The aim of this study was to test acceptability and feasibility of implementing SUH in UK contact centres. Methods: The study was conducted in 2020–2022 (pre COVID and during lockdown) and used a stepped-wedge cluster randomised trial design including a process evaluation. The intervention included working with contact centre managers to develop and implement a customised action plan aligning with SUH's theory of change. Workplace sedentary time, measured using activPAL™ devices, was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included productivity, mental wellbeing, musculoskeletal health and physical activity. Empirical estimates of between-centre standard deviation and within-centre standard deviation of outcomes from pre-lockdown data were calculated to inform sample size calculations for future trials. The process evaluation adopted the RE-AIM framework to understand acceptability and feasibility of implementing the intervention. Interviews and focus groups were conducted with contact centre employees and managers, and activity preferences were collected using a questionnaire. Results: A total of 11 contact centres participated: 155 employees from 6 centres in the pre-lockdown data collection, and 54 employees from 5 centres post-lockdown. Interviews and focus groups were conducted with 33 employees and managers, and 96 participants completed an intervention activity preference questionnaire. Overall, the intervention was perceived as acceptable and feasible to deliver. Most centres implemented several intervention activities aligned with SUH's theory of change and over 50% of staff participated in at least one activity (pre-lockdown period). Perceived benefits including reduced sedentary behaviour, increased physical activity, and improved staff morale and mood were reported by contact centre employees and managers. Conclusions: SUH demonstrates potential as an appealing and acceptable intervention, impacting several wellbeing outcomes. Trial registration: The trial has been registered on the ISRCTNdatabase: http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN11580369. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]
Subject Terms: SEDENTARY behavior, COVID-19 pandemic, FEASIBILITY studies, EVALUATION methodology, SERVER farms (Computer network management)
Geographic Terms: UNITED Kingdom
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ISSN: 19326203
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0293602
Database: Complementary Index